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What are the types and sources of laboratory waste
Source: | Author:AUWII | Time:2020-12-16 | 91 Access | Share:
Let me introduce to you, what are the types and sources of laboratory waste liquids? Generally, a lot of unnecessary waste liquids are generated during the working process of laboratory analytical instruments. The volatilization of these waste liquids will seriously affect the experiment if they are not properly treated. For the health of laboratory personnel, what are the types and sources of laboratory waste?

Let me introduce to you, what are the types and sources of laboratory waste liquids? Generally, a lot of unnecessary waste liquids are generated during the working process of laboratory analytical instruments. The volatilization of these waste liquids will seriously affect the experiment if they are not properly treated. For the health of laboratory personnel, what are the types and sources of laboratory waste?

Temporary classification standard for laboratory waste liquid:

A: Organic waste liquid

(1) Greases: waste oil (grease) produced by school laboratories or factories, such as kerosene, light oil, turpentine, paint, heavy oil, creosote oil, spindle oil, insulating oil (grease) (not including excessive Chlorinated biphenyl), lubricating oil, cutting oil, cooling oil, animal and vegetable oil (grease), etc.


(2) Halogen-containing organic solvents: waste solvents produced by school laboratories or factories, which contain aliphatic halogen compounds, such as chloroform, methyl chloride, difluoromethane, picochlorocarbon, methyl iodide Etc. or containing aromatic halogen compounds, such as chlorobenzene, benzyl chloride, etc.


(3) Halogen-free organic solvents: waste solvents produced by school laboratories or factories, which do not contain aliphatic halogen compounds or aromatic halogen compounds.


B: Inorganic waste liquid

(1) Waste liquid containing heavy metals: Waste liquid produced by school laboratories or factories. The waste liquid contains any kind of heavy metals (such as iron, cobalt, copper, manganese, cadmium, lead, gallium, chromium, titanium, Nagisa , Tin, aluminum, magnesium, nickel, zinc, silver, etc.).


(2) Cyanide-containing waste liquid: waste liquid produced by school laboratories or factories, which contains free cyanide waste liquid (should be stored above pH10.5) or contains cyanide compounds or cyanide compounds.


(3) Waste liquid containing mercury: Waste liquid produced by school laboratories or factories, which contains mercury.


(4) Fluorine-containing waste liquid: Waste liquid produced by school laboratories or factories, which contains fluoric acid or fluorine compounds.


(5) Acid and alkaline waste liquid: waste liquid produced in school laboratories or factories, which contains acid or alkali.


(6) Waste liquid containing hexavalent chromium: waste liquid produced by school laboratories or factories, which contains hexavalent chromium compounds.


C: Sludge and solids

(1) Combustible and infectious waste: the infectious waste of combustible equipment generated in the research and inspection process by school laboratories or hospitals (excluding profit teaching hospitals), such as: waste specimens, waste specimens, Human or animal residual limbs, organs or tissues, waste dialysis equipment, waste blood or blood products, etc.


(2) Non-combustible and infectious waste: non-combustible and infectious waste generated by school laboratories or hospitals (excluding profitable teaching medicines) in the process of research and inspection, such as needles, blades, Suture needles and other instruments, and glass syringes, petri dishes, test tubes, test slides, etc.


(3) Organic sludge: organic sludge produced by school laboratories or factories, such as oil sludge, fermented waste, etc.


(4) Inorganic sludge: organic sludge produced by school laboratories or factories, such as grit sludge in concrete laboratories or materials laboratories, rainwater drainage pipes or manhole sludge, drilling sludge, etc. .


High-concentration waste acid and waste lye must be neutralized and discharged when they are neutral. High-concentration organic solvents containing a small amount of analytes and other reagents should be recycled and reused. The high-concentration waste liquid used for recycling should be stored centrally for recycling; the low-concentration waste liquid should be discharged after treatment, and the storage container and storage conditions should be determined according to the nature of the waste liquid. Generally, different waste liquids are not allowed to be mixed, avoid light and keep away from heat sources. An adverse chemical reaction occurred. Waste liquid storage containers must be labeled, indicating the type, storage time, etc.